Korean War Legacy Project

Frank Seaman

Bio

Frank Seaman began his military career as a member of the National Guard and then extended his service as a member of the Army, serving overseas in the Korean War. He recounts his arrival in Korea and describes his regular duties of transporting ammunition and fuel as part of the Headquarters Service Company. He shares memories of his first encounter with Bed Check Charlie and recounts dangerous moments during his time in Korea–one including a landmine. He offers his view on why the Korean War is known as the Forgotten War and shares how the war changed South Korea for the better. He comments on the importance of the Korean War and is proud of South Korea’s development.

Clips

Arriving in Korea and Bed Check Charlie

Frank Seaman describes his arrival in Korea, ferrying over from Japan to Pusan and then by rail up to Chuncheon. He recalls viewing the aftermath and destruction from the Pusan Perimeter battle on his way to Chuncheon. He offers insight to his regular duties which entailed bringing ammunition up from the south. He also recounts his introduction to Bed Check Charlie following breakfast while washing his mess kit.

Tags: 1950 Pusan Perimeter, 8/4-9/18,Busan,Chuncheon,Chinese,North Koreans,Physical destruction,Weapons

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgmaLwrUTQg&start=385&end=519

Driving Over a Landmine

Frank Seaman describes a dangerous, night, service run to tanks on the Main Line of Resistance (MLR). He recalls riding in the passenger seat on a truck carrying 200-250 rounds of 90 millimeter ammunition along with 50 and 30 caliber machine gun ammunition when a sudden explosion took place. He remembers a flash and flying through the windshield as his truck had hit a landmine.

Tags: Fear,Physical destruction,Weapons

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgmaLwrUTQg&start=808&end=922

Korean War: Forgotten and Its Importance

Frank Seaman shares his view on why the Korean War is known as the Forgotten War. He shares that when he came home, no one knew where he had been and that the war was not even talked about; life just went on. He also describes why he feels the Korean War was important and how the war changed South Korea.

Tags: Chuncheon,Seoul,Home front,Impressions of Korea,Modern Korea

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgmaLwrUTQg&start=1240&end=1395

Dangerous Moment and Living Conditions

Frank Seaman shares one of his most dangerous moments while serving and recalls his basic living conditions. He recounts a particular service run to deliver fuel to a platoon of tanks where mortar rounds came in before his departure. Unscathed, he remembers dealing with flat tires on his truck on his return back to base. He also provides insight to his living conditions, describing pup tents and larger tents which could provide shelter for 4 to 5 men.

Tags: Fear,Food,Living conditions,Weapons

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgmaLwrUTQg&start=629&end=807

Photos

Frank Seaman

Frank Seaman on his last day in Korea. Taken in February of 1952.
Subject : Frank Seaman
Coverage : Korea February 1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 02/01/52

Frank Seaman

Frank Seaman with Fellow Soldiers

A picture of Frank Seaman with fellow soldiers in Eta Jima, Japan. L to R: Mr. Seaman, Mr. Held, Mr. Fried, Mr. Sague.
Subject : Frank Seaman, soldiers
Coverage : Eta Jima, Japan
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA

Frank Seaman with Fellow Soldiers

Frank Seaman 2

A picture of Frank Seaman posing for the camera on top of boulders and rocks on a field. Taken in 1951-1952 Korea.
Subject : Frank Seaman, boulders, field
Coverage : Korea 1951-1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 1951-52

Frank Seaman 2

Frank Seaman

A picture of Frank Seaman on top of a hill. Taken in August-September of 1950 in Korea.
Subject : Cobane, hill
Coverage : Korea 1951-1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 1951-1952

Frank Seaman

Nature meets Tank

A picture of a M4 Sherman tank with Mt. Fuji in the backdrop. M4 Sherman tanks were introduced mainly in WWII and improved versions of the tank was used not just in the Korean War but other wars as well. Taken in Japan.
Subject : Mt. Fuji, M4-Sherman
Coverage : Japan
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA

Nature meets Tank

Christmas Card

A 1951 Christmas card issued from The Chinese People's Volunteers.
Subject : card
Coverage : 1951
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 12/25/51

Christmas Card

Domain of the Golden Dragon Certificate

A certificate initiating Frank Seaman into the Silent Mysteries of the Far East. The certificate says as follows: “To all Sailors, Soldiers, Marines, wherever ye may be and to all mermaids, flying dragons, spirits of the deep, devil chasers, and all other living creatures of the yellow seas, Greetings: Know ye that on this 15 day of July 1951, in latitude 50 degrees 16'N longitude 180 degrees there appeared within the limits of my august dwelling the U.S.N.S. General M.M. Patrick T-AP 150. Hearken Ye: The said vessel, officers and crew have been inspected and passed on by my august body and staff. And know ye: ye that are chit signers, squaw men, opium smokers, ice men, and all-round landlubbers that Frank A. Seaman, PVT, USA, having been found sane and worthy to be numbered a dweller of the Far East has been gathered in my fold and duly initiated into the Silent Mysteries of the Far East. Be it further understood: That by virtue of the power vested in me I do hereby command all moneylenders, wine sellers, cabaret owners, club managers, and all my other subjects to show honor and respect to all his wishes whenever he may enter my realm. Disobey this command under penalty of my august displeasure.
Subject : certificate
Coverage : 07/15/51
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 07/15/51

Domain of the Golden Dragon Certificate

Korean War Propaganda

A Korean War propaganda.
Subject : Propaganda
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA

Korean War Propaganda

Voyage Souvenir Pamphlet

A Voyage Souvenir pamphlet along with information on the Gen. M.M. Patrick, a C-4 type vessel. Frank Seaman (KWV), once sailed on this vessel. The description says: A C-4 type vessel, PATRICK is named in honor of Major General Mason Matthews Patrick, who helped raise the ill-fated USS MAINE, and who was chief of the Air Service, AEF, in World War I. She was built by the Kaiser Company of Richmond, California, and delivered to duty late in 1944 to the Navy. Her area of operation included the entire Pacific Ocean and a trip to Calcutta, India, thence to New York via Port Said. She was delivered to the Army for conversion to peactime use in March of 1946. She now makes regular runs to Yokohama as a member of the Seattle Port of Embarkation fleet, and will pass to the control of the Military Sea Transportation Service in 1950.
Subject : pamphlet
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA

Voyage Souvenir Pamphlet

Frank Seaman (1)

Frank Seaman posing for the camera with a rifle in hand. Taken in 1951-1952 in Korea.
Subject : Frank Seaman, fields, tent
Coverage : Korea 1951-1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 1951-52

Frank Seaman (1)

Seaman

A picture of Frank Seaman.
Subject : Frank Seaman
Coverage : Korea 1951-1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 1951-1952

Seaman

View from Top of Hill

A picture of the 6 Med Tank BN Headquarters from the top of a hill in Korea. Taken in August-September of 1950.
Subject : 6 Med Tank BN Headquarters
Coverage : Korea 1951-1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 1951-1952

View from Top of Hill

Tank

A picture of a tank that hit a land mine. As a result, the driver was killed. Taken by Frank Seaman in 1951-1952 in Korea.
Subject : tank
Coverage : Korea 1951-1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 1951-1952

Tank

M-46 Plane

An M-46 dug in for winter. Taken by Frank Seaman in Korea during 1951-1952.
Subject : M-46 aircraft
Coverage : Korea 1951-1952
Creator : Frank Seaman
Publisher : Frank Seaman
Contributor : Jongwoo Han
Rights : KWVA veterans & KWVDA
Date : 1951-1952

M-46 Plane

Video Transcript

 

[Start of Recorded Material]

0:00:00

Frank Seaman: My name is Frank Seaman. I was born right here in Hyannis Mass on February, 5th, 1933.

 

Interviewer:  Mm-hmm

 

I attended, graduated from Boswell High School Class of 1950.

 

I:  Mm-hmm

 

F: With the first class that went over 100

 

I: mm-hmm

 

F: The same year on February, I  turned 17,  February 1950

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: I joined the National Guard

 

00: 00:30

 

I was assigned to Headquarters Battery 680, fifth triple A Gun Battalion. I was

stationed up in Buzzards Bay.  Captain Oscar Johnson was our commanding officer. He also lived in (Sinnable) with me and on Monday night drill nights,

 

00:01:00

Oscar would put on his captain’s hat and he picked me up into his brand-new 1950 Mercury.

 

I:  Mm-hmm

 

F: And we drive up the Buzzards Bay and the drill. Well after a year of Monday night drills, I got a little tired of that, so in February 1951 I got a release from the Guard and join the regular army.

 

I: Huh.

 

F: I took the train out of the, the old Hyannis train depot at East,

 

00:01:30

 

East Main Street Hyannis up to Boston.

 

I: And joined the army, right?

 

F:  Right. And went to Boston Army base where I  was inducted and sworn in. And then from there we went up to Fort Devens where I was processed and got my GI- issued clothing. Took some tests and they asked me what I did for a job in

 

00:02:00

Civilian. Well at seventeen I drove a laundry route from Hyannis to P-town.

 

I: MM-hmm.

 

F: So I guess that set my course. I ended up down in Fort Lee, Virginia to quarter master replacement training center. I was assigned to Company D, First Platoon.  And we’re being briefed and welcomed the Cadre asked, did anybody have prior military training? I said, I raised my

 

00:02:30

hand, I said yeah I was in the National Guard.  He says good even you’re a squad leader. So that was good. Being squad leader didn’t have to pull KP or boiler duty. Then, we anyway, we finished basic training, went over to MOS training which was Supplied Record, Records Specialist with a five weeks course that included typing which helped out later in my

 

00:03:00

 

journey. In that course I met four guys, we became very good friends. At the end of the course we all got orders to go to Korea.

 

I: When was that that?

 

F: That was in,  that would be around July.

 

I: 1951?

 

F: July ‘51

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F:  And went home for leave. Then we caught a train out of Boston for five day trip

 

00:03:30

 

across the country to Seattle.

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: We traveled with the general public using the dining car and the sleeper car. Great trip. I still, remem- I still can hear the rhythm of the railroad tracks you know, boom boom boom boom boom.

 

I: (LAUGHS)

 

F:  Anyway we got the Seattle and went up to Fort Lawton where we were put aboard the troop ship General, General, MM Patrick

 

00:04:00

 

for a eleven-day trip across the Pacific to Yokohama. When we get on the ship, the troop commander he assigned us to the four of us to work on the ship’s paper. That’s Pat’s Patter. This is where the typing came in handy, we were used to cut stencils for the mimeograph. Troop Commander also figures well,

 

00:04:30

we’re working on the paper so he didn’t he took us out of where all the troops were and put us in a room with four beds a stateroom.

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: Anyway we got across the Pacific we arrived in Yokohama with the band welcom-, welcoming us playing “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” and “St. Louis Woman.” Then from there we went up to Camp Drake

 

00:05:00

where we drawed our M1 rifles and combat gear. Rifles in (INAUDIBLE) so we had to clean that up. Went to the range, zeroed it in. Then we got out, the four of us got,  to turn in our rifles, turn in our combat gear and (INAUDIBLE) some khakis, we’ve been sent down to Etajima, Japan to a unit supply specialist school.

 

I: Mm-hmm.

 

F: So Etajima Japan was

 

00:05:30

 

on an island just south of Hiroshima.

 

I: Yeah

 

F: It used to be the Japanese Naval Academy where General Admiral Yamamoto took his training.

 

I: Yeah, yep.

 

F:  While we were there, we, General Ridgeway paid a visit and got to see him with his hand grenades hanging on his lapels. And we did get to take a side trip over to Hiroshima to see it would have looked like five years after the

 

00:06:00

After the, the A-bomb.

 

I: Why? So you’d stayed there quite long there?

 

F: A month, we was there 4 weeks.

 

I: Oh, ok.

 

F: And , excuse me, from there we went to, after we graduated from the supply course,  we were sent down to Saseb, where we drew out another rifle in (INAUDIBLE) and cleaned it up and our combat gear and then we were put on a Japanese ferry

 

I:  Mm-hmm

 

F: we sailed across

 

00:06:30

To Pusan

 

I: When was that?

 

F:  God, let me see. That’d had to be around near the end of August or September. We got to Pusan, we were put on a rail, train and sent up to Chuncheon.

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F:  And when we pulled out of a Pusan we saw the destroyed tanks and artillery pieces from the Battle of the Pusan Perimeter and

 

00:07:00

 

we got up to Chuncheon. This is where the four of us went our separate ways. I never, never got to see any of those guys again. I was assigned to the 6th Medium Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Which at that time was back in reserve getting replacements, getting built up to battle strength. So battallion trucks picked us up and took us up to where, where the battalion was back in reserve.

 

00:07:30

 

I was assigned to a headquarters service company.

 

I: In Chuncheon?

 

F: No this is up where they were back in reserve.

 

I: Uh-huh.

 

F: They took us from to Chuncheon up by truck.

 

I: Yeah.

 

F: Anyway, I was assigned to the Headquarters Service Company there. The job would be to bring ammunition up

 

00:08:00

 

from the south, you know, to the reup at the POL dumps from the ammo dumps. (ABRUPT START) And anyway after being there about a week I was just finish eating breakfast and I was out at the, outside the mess tent washing my mess kit up and the barrels of water when Bed Check Charlie paid us a visit. He swooped down, a propeller plane, and strafed the mess tent

 

00:08:30

 

then went on a little hill and strafed Charlie Company’s mess tent and blew up the field stove. So that was my introduction to Bed Check Charlie.

 

I: (LAUGHS)

 

F: After two or three weeks we moved up we left to go up to a forward positions with the offensive.  We were traveling by riverbed and I was in a, up in the truck up in the front attack. The tanks with traveling behind us

 

00:09:00

 

and we came under artillery attack, so we pulled over the riverbank, jumped out of the truck, and

hunkered down in the ditch, and the tanks buttoned up. I say there was around eight of ten rounds came in. And I laid on it. As quick as it started, it stopped, and the tanks opened up and gave the all clear. so then we continued on and we set up forward base at the foot of a large

 

00:09:30

 

hill that was just recently taken by the infantry.

 

I:  Mm-hmm.

 

F:  After we got settled, three of us climbed up the hill to see what it looked like it. There was quite a few dead enemy soldiers laying around, Chinese. And, I don’t think it’d been there too long. Anyway what are they do from then.

 

00:10:00

 

I guess, I’m trying to figure that what I was doing was traveling to the rear to the POL dumps and the ammo dumps. The tanks ran on ninety octane gasoline and (INAUDIBLE) was 90 millimeters. Then they had 50 calibers and 230 caliber machine guns, so um…

 

00:10:30

 

I: What was the most dangerous moment during your service?

 

F: Most of my runs to the coast to the rear, to the tanks when they were out on a mission making runs to supply them with either gas or ammo. Most of the runs were without incident but two are burned in my mind that happened. Well, I’d say in late Oct, October

 

00:11:00

 

Early November

 

I: Mm-hmm.

 

F: Of ’51. I was making a gas run to a platoon of tanks and I remember crossing a couple (Bailey) bridges and when I got near where the tanks where I made a right turn around a hill and there was an open valley quite a long open Valley

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: The tanks were down at the end on the right behind a little behind a little hill so I pulled up with the tanks

 

00:11:30

backed up, dropped off the gas at the barrels that they requested. After they gassed up they backed around and picked up the empties .And it was getting quite late in the day. And the tank crew invited me to join them with a gourmet meal of C-rations.

 

I: (LAUGHS) Gourmet

 

F: So I stand at the back of the tank, with a with a tank crew and all of a sudden mortar rounds came in.

 

00:12:00

I: Uh-h.

 

F: I jumped under the tank, the tankers jumped in the thank and buttoned up. I would say about four or five rounds dropped in. The tanks unbuttoned and gave the all clear— evidently their mortar was taken out I guess. Now it’s getting quite late in the day so I figured I better get back so I headed back down that Valley I had the pedal to the metal by the time I got down near the end of the valley, I made a left turn

 

00:12:30

around the hill all my tires with flat but two. So I had to pull over the side of the road and there happened to be a half-track there. Now it’s getting kind of dusk and the temperature is dropping The guys in the half-track invited me in to keep warm and it turned out they were a radio relay track.

 

I: Hmm.

 

F: So they telegraph back to my outfit my problem and about I’d say eleven o’clock, midnight

 

00:13:00

 

I: Mm-hmm

F: (INAUDBLE) pulled up with all the tires in the back and we changed them out and got back to the company.

 

I: Where were you staying? Were you in the pup tent or in the barracks or?

 

F: No, no we’re in sometimes we’re pup tents and sometime we’re in a tent that held four or five of us.

 

00:13:30

 

Anyway, my next run is really in my memory. We were making a night run to, to the tanks that are up on the MLR. I was riding shotgun. The truck, our truck was full of 90 millimeter, I guess we had about 200, 250 rounds of 90 millimeter.

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F:  50 caliber, 30 caliber machine gun boxes stacked up behind the cab of the truck

 

00:14:00

 

and I will see it was a moonless night, dark. I think we’re about the third vehicle back running by cat-eye. It was a jeep and a three-quarter-ton pulling a water trailer. And all of a sudden a tremendous explosion, flash, the truck went up on its nose the driver and I went flying out over the windshield and

 

00:14:30

 

I heard the driver go running up, running up the road and I, I jumped down in a ditch. I had my M2 carbine and dead silence. I could smell the cordite and smoke drifting down and then I heard a bunch of foreign, foreign talking and running.  And I says oh Jesus and my heart pumping right out of my chest.  Well anyway that turned out to be a ROK Patrol

 

00:15:00

 

that come running down to see what happened and then somebody yelled, they hit a landline.

 

I: Oh

 

F: So I took a deep breath and got up out of the ditch and they pulled up a couple of half tracks and we transferred the load over to the half- tracks, and push the truck off the road, and went up and completed the mission.  Those are my two most two memorable deliveries

 

00:15:30

 

Others were incidental so. Anyway went to went to (INAUDIBLE) status known, so we dug in for the winter. And then we heard that the 24thdivision was going to be replaced by the 40th. So then we got a shipment of duffel bags and evidently there was a guy in our outfit must have been a sign painter

 

00:16:00

 

when he was a civilian because he hand-painted all our names and serial numbers on the bags. He did a great job. Anyway the day came when we’re going to leave Korea. It was in February ’52. Kind of a pleasant day, sun was out, temperature in the teens, but we didn’t get to leave till 10:00 at night in open trucks

 

00:16:30

 

We had the Mickey Mouse boots with two layers of socks and by the time we left the temperature dropped down the minuses. We took battalion trucks down to a point where we transferred over to core trucks. The core trucks took us down the Chincheon, we stopped off to have coffee and doughnuts. Then we got back on the trucks and headed to Incheon we didn’t

get to Incheon til in the morning.

 

00:17:00

 

And the ship had the cargo holds poured over so we loaded onto, loaded onto the ship and picked out a spot on the cargo hold and laid out our sleeping bag. I took off my Mickey Mouse boots and my two feet look like two white prunes. After being warmed up a while the blood got back into ‘em and they came looking back two normal feet again

 

00:17:30

Anyway we heard that we’re going to be stationed that the Camp Fuji which is right on the base of Mount Fuji.

 

I: Mm-hmm, mm-hmm.

 

F: So we left, we left Incheon but we didn’t arrive back and

 

I: When was it?

 

F: This was February ’52.

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: And we arrived back in Japan at night and got into our squad tents and it was the first night I got to sleep between

 

00:18:00

 

sheets and on a bed for about six months.

 

I: (LAUGHS)

 

F: I got up the next morning, stepped outside the tank, looked up and there was Mount Fuji. So I spent the next fourteen, fifteen months in Japan, had another school down at Etaima of the M-46 Patton tank. that was a five-week school.

 

00:18:30

 

Well then come back from there, I got the promoted to Corporal. And after I guess what 14 or 15 months I finally got enough points to rotate back to the states. And I think, I think it was the General Walker that I shipped back to San Francisco on. From there I flew back home for a leave

 

00:19:00

 

And then after the leave I was back up in Camp Devens, For Devens for reassignment. Well they assigned me to Headquarters (Barry) 144th AAA Gun Battalion, 44thDivision in Seattle in Fort Lewis, Fort Lewis, Washington.  I was assigned to the motor pool, had to be in there.

 

00:19:30

 

About two or three months I was promoted to Staff Sergeant,. took over the job of Motor Sergeant until discharge time came up. About a week before I was to discharged my battery commander called me in and wanted to send me to helicopter training.

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: But the only catch was I’d have to reenlist and the Mess Sergeant

 

00:20:00

 

he said he cooked me a whole chicken dinner if I’d reenlist.

 

I: (LAUGHS)

 

F: I’d had enough. Anyway, I went over to North Fort Lewis, got discharged, flew home that was in February of ’54.

 

00:20:30

April of ’54. I hired on to New England Telephone Company and work in the telephone business for 41 years, retired in 1995. All I can say is I came through Korea unscathed and I’m here today.

 

I: Why do you think that the Korean War has been called as “forgotten?”

 

F: Because it was forgotten. When I came home nobody, nowhere didn’t know where I’ve been or the Korean War wasn’t even mentioned, talked about. Life just went on

 

I: Why?

 

00:21:30

 

Why people didn’t pay any attention to Korea War?

 

F:  Well I think it was, was a bad but… Actually back in the states is a good time, the 50s.

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: Nobody, I don’t think people just paid any attention to it.

 

I:  What do you think is the importance of Korean War?

 

F: Well you look at South Korea and you look at North Korea

 

I: Mm-hmm

 

F: I think that that proves it

 

00:21:30

 

right there what the importance was. What would have happened if we didn’t intervene and North Korea took over  South Korea? The whole Peninsula would be same way, isolated and crazy.

 

I: Have you been back to Korea?

 

F: No, no I, I,  I wouldn’t recognize it from what I’ve heard there ,it’s quite a different place today

 

I: Yeah this is seventh largest trading partner to the United States.

 

00:22:00

 

11th largest economy in the world. 11th.

 

F: I can remember taking trips back to Chincheon and I think I made one trip down the Seoul to pick up some kind of rations and I would never recognize it today I’m sure.

 

I: it’s a fool of buildings, you know.

 

F: Subway

 

I: Subways, so many bridges over the Han River.

 

F: No Bailey bridges?

 

00:22:30

 

(LAUGHS)

 

I: So you did a nice job to save us.

 

F: For years I never thought back on it until the Cape and Islands KWVA was started, got together. I was a charter member. In fact I brought the primetime there with a pictures of me that was taken back in 97.

 

00:23:00

 

Only then did I start thinking about Korea again, nobody ever talked about it. And I’m not comfortable talking about it anyway about myself.

 

I: Mm-hmm. This, this year 2013 is the 60th anniversary of Armistice

 

F: Right

 

I: and US-Korea alliance. What do you think about that? That the Korea is still divided and still at war technically.

 

23:30

 

F: Right

 

I: What do you think?

 

F: I’d really don’t know how long it’s gonna be that way. it may be that way for probably as long as I’m on this planet.

 

I: LAUGHS

 

F: I don’t know.

 

I: Do you think that the American government should support for the reunification of the Korean Peninsula?

 

F: Sure.

 

00:24:00

 

I mean that’s what we went there for originally. oh yeah. Why throw it all away?

 

I: We talked about the first Korean War veterans’ descendant workshop in the Washington DC in July. My foundation the Korean War Veterans Digital Memorial will fund that workshop. Would you be willing to talk your grandkids and asking them to participate in it?

 

F: The one oldest one, she’ll be 17

 

00:24:30

 

I: Yeah

 

F: next month.

 

I: Mm-hmm you will do that?

 

F:  yeah, I’ll do that.

 

I: And it’s a lifetime opportunity to, to meet with other Korean War veterans’ descendants and they can do a lot about legacy of the Korean War and your service. So it will be great to have your grandson

 

F: Daughter

 

I: Granddaughter? or even better

 

F: Granddaughter, yeah

 

I: Yeah it will be great, you know. Ask her to join us, okay?

 

F: Yeah

 

00:25:00

 

I: Yeah. Any other message that you want to leave with this interview?

 

F:  Well like I said I came through Korea unscathed. I’m here today.

 

I: Mm-hmm. How do you assess the impact of your service in the Korean War upon your life? What kind of impact does that have on you?

 

F: Well I think from the day I was born it was meant to be.

 

00:25:30

 

I wouldn’t change any of it because I’m happy where I am today.

 

I:  Did your service help you or about your career after the after you discharged from the military?

 

F: No, actually they were unrelated then, you know ya, it’s… what do I want to say? Luck of the draw. You play the hand you’re dealt

 

00:26:00

 

I was sitting at home and a friend of my father stopped by and said, what are you going

to do? I said I don’t know. He said, well why don’t you join the telephone company? Well that’s that’s how I get in the telephone company.

 

I: (LAUGHS)

 

F: It’s just like I say, luck of the draw.

 

I: Any message to our young generation about your service, about military, about nation, and the war?

 

00:26:30

 

F: Like I said I have a grandson who put 8 years in the Marines. He served two tours in Iraq, and a tour in Afghanistan, and discharged as a Sergeant in the Marines. He’s quite a changed person after that, so…

 

00:27:00

 

 

I don’t know.

 

I: Frank, thank you very much for your service. And your sacrifice has a direct impact upon what Korea is right now. And thank you for your time and willingness to share your story with the foundation so that your memories will be preserved in the Korean War Veterans Digital Memorial Foundation’s website.

 

F: Thank you.

 

I: Thank you very much again

[End of Recorded Material]