Korean War Legacy Project

Richard Faron

Bio

Richard G. Faron was born in Queens, New York. He was working for a bank in Uniondale, New York before he enlisted in the Army. His military service was from early 1952 to November 1954. During his service, after arriving in Inchon, Korea, he was stationed in Seoul from October 1952 to October 1954. Although being trained in Infantry Artillery, he was placed in charge of finance and pay for U.S. military personnel with the 21st Finance Corp, Seoul City Command. After returning to the United States, he was discharged and went to college. What impacted him most during the war was the poverty he witnessed.

Video Clips

Soldier Pay

Mr. Faron describes his pay during the war. He explains how the money was used during the Korean War. He talks about how soldiers supported their families back in the U.S. He shares about the task of getting the money to pay soldiers.

Tags: Daegu,Home front,Living conditions

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xzs3DEqXzdE&start=494&end=763

Poverty Affected All

Mr. Faron recalls how people were starving. He describes the poverty of the South Koreans. He hired children to help so they could have food. He shares an interaction with a young boy who was stealing food to survive.

Tags: Food,Living conditions,Poverty,South Koreans

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xzs3DEqXzdE&start=943&end=1038

Basic Training

Richard Faron describes arriving at Fort Chaffee in Fort Smith, Arkansas. He explains his time in 1952 preparing for infantry and artillery training. He shares that after four months their for basic training, he was sent to Ft. Lewis in Tacoma, Washington, then on a boat to Japan and finally landing in Incheon in 1953.

Tags: Incheon,Basic training

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xzs3DEqXzdE&start=220&end=302

Video Transcript

0:00
name is Richard Ferran fa RM i was born
0:04
in New York in Queens ah a little hamlet
0:08
called st. Albans right I grew up there
0:13
I then moved around long as my family
0:17
moves obviously how’d it go with them
0:19
and when I was about I’ll just shy of 18
0:25
years of age not being able to get a job
0:28
hmm I volunteered to be drafted into the
0:32
own the not familiar with that I could
0:36
have give you a little explanation but I
0:39
didn’t want to be regular lonely because
0:41
it was a three year but duration and I I
0:45
really didn’t want to stay up as careers
0:48
carry on top of land I thought I would
0:53
be for rap full rack or a hora hora was
0:58
a category where why they wouldn’t take
1:00
you away oh you had something wrong with
1:02
you medically physically whereby you
1:05
couldn’t perform what services they were
1:07
you to perform obviously shooting a gun
1:10
was one of them okay I happen to be
1:13
blind in my right eye I was blind in my
1:16
right eye when they drafted me and when
1:19
I say blind I was blind to the extent
1:22
that i was unable to fire a weapon with
1:26
my right eye which is of course what was
1:29
necessary so they told him like a long
1:33
story short they taught me how to
1:34
acquire obtaining when I went to basic
1:36
training and it was never any quarrel
1:39
about it they just so merrily put me in
1:42
mmm they didn’t ask me anything about my
1:44
eyes that’s it and that’s what that
1:47
point was important because I didn’t
1:49
expect her I would go in and be a grey I
1:52
didn’t know a lot about career anybody I
1:55
know that you ask me well I’m 80 years
2:00
old now what was the year that you were
2:03
born I was born in 1932 19
2:06
to write some the 24th 1932 so it was 18
2:12
years old when you first hear about the
2:14
breakout of Korean War well no I have
2:17
heard about it but I didn’t know a great
2:20
deal about it I was on a student of it
2:24
all right so I exposure was a newspaper
2:28
the fact i’m waiting and how much TV so
2:32
it was a radio but i was always a sports
2:35
enthusiast so I wasn’t listening too
2:37
much raised I’m doing sports so your
2:40
student when you first heard about the
2:43
Korean War oh yes I was high school high
2:46
school yes high school what was your
2:48
first reaction about the Korean War you
2:50
did you said that you you are not aware
2:52
of where career was and so on right
2:55
although I didn’t know where crew oh
2:57
because i knew that i delet you are to
3:00
point by the Japanese so I think it’s
3:02
back so prone in 1904 mm-hmm I didn’t
3:05
tell what about that I’ve learned that
3:07
in history I probably one of the only
3:08
things i’ve learned his history okay but
3:12
wallah now I just knew where it was I
3:15
was adjacent to Japan and small country
3:22
divided in well actually weren’t wider
3:24
than to them hopefully I don’t have a
3:27
good recollection of that I believe you
3:30
were one country back when the Korean
3:33
was started if we were physically
3:37
divided anyway um then I went to a
3:41
little place called Fort Chaffee
3:43
Arkansas Arkansas with all due respect
3:48
the hell’s holding earth bad place
3:51
didn’t like anyway I was there for
3:53
months I was infantry and worldwide
3:58
horses are touring and when was that
4:03
1950 that was nineteen fifty early
4:07
nineteen fifty-two okay then after that
4:14
that was four months before most basic
4:16
training that I was given a one-way
4:19
clean
4:20
and then I was shipped to Tacoma
4:24
Washington my port louis from where i
4:28
departed and two weeks later after the
4:31
ocean land and accessible Japan and I
4:35
trash it from there to ensure when was
4:40
that exactly when you were first arrived
4:42
in Korea oh I knew you would ask me that
4:45
and exactly it is approximately um let’s
4:48
see I could backtrack a little bit here
4:52
hormones therefore I whenever I went in
4:55
and october 52 so that would have been
4:59
january 5353 yeah so you were in the
5:05
army infantry right look how does any
5:07
only autori artillery I told ya I was
5:11
trained as an infantryman and emma has
5:13
an auto room past year special Union
5:15
loved was my special unit yeah when I
5:19
got to career mm-hmm why they quickly
5:22
and probably for the first time was that
5:25
my medical records and the company
5:28
commander that and I don’t even remember
5:30
the company because I was only there a
5:32
very short on a couple of days
5:34
discovered that I was behind my right
5:36
eye he was afraid I would kill more of
5:38
new people and less people never put the
5:41
game of it so they trust would meet a
5:44
soul and as well I I was in the finance
5:48
core okay finance corp finance core what
5:53
is that that’s only say that we pay the
5:56
troops mm-hmm it was called a 21st
5:59
finance core and it was part of Seoul
6:02
City command I say okay the station
6:07
right by the South Gate which I couldn’t
6:12
go blind when I went back to career
6:13
reviewing last shit I don’t know the
6:16
exact dates still there but I wanted to
6:18
see it and then I guess I was about how
6:21
was the trip up suffocated the tall soul
6:23
was just a desert I mean it was
6:25
literally like the people live didn’t
6:29
you know shacks
6:32
Karen paper mache and early it’s a very
6:35
difficult situation of course I I have
6:41
no idea what to expect when I got there
6:43
and that was quite a surprise to me
6:46
interested and it was I was a
6:51
nondescript type of following the army
6:54
all right because i was in the high
6:57
score and I did that was I was there for
7:01
17 ones i left i love solo career was
7:06
november october for people 54 october
7:12
for people and after 17 laws right and
7:16
the only thing i really got involved in
7:19
in terms of military handguns was when
7:23
they repatriated the 100,000 chinese
7:26
troops through souls whenever should be
7:30
muslim to taiwan we all perform well god
7:35
services over those people other than
7:39
that I was really just a financier am I
7:43
correct mm-hmm will say I enjoyed my
7:47
time in a service it was interesting
7:51
interesting I got to Japan a couple of
7:55
times and just lived existed could you
8:03
tell me a little bit more about what is
8:06
the seller is standard for each well i
8:09
can write it for each I just tell me
8:12
what is theirs rivals in fact in a
8:14
private private first class right one
8:18
strike probably made one hundred and ten
8:22
dollars a wolf with 110 dollars what can
8:25
you buy that guy yeah how powerful was
8:29
that I would put it in this perspective
8:35
in the United States when I did have a
8:37
few i need twenty-five
8:39
a week so I wasn’t too bad nice embarked
8:43
on 24 hours a week in the United States
8:45
almost same as in the United States all
8:47
right it was of course you know we could
8:50
get what they call combat duty tonight
8:52
with you because we were in a combat
8:54
zone who knows i’m gonna how to be able
8:57
to combat with right over there not
8:59
we’ve had been only 18 miles from the
9:01
per line I guess that’s what helped our
9:03
soul was what was I pardon my mic
9:09
scanning the world i am trying to back
9:11
think um a corporal probably made 130
9:17
miles was my recollection of a general
9:21
hmm was eighty thousand years 80,000
9:28
that’s my recollection indistinct but
9:31
roughly eighty thousand dollars a year
9:34
that would have been generally cost the
9:37
type of person did you pay monthly or by
9:40
law we paid monthly monthly and did you
9:43
pay cash they catch yes not because
9:47
there was no checking facilities for the
9:50
troops and of course back then well you
9:55
wouldn’t remember because you are in
9:57
life I guess we use what we called one
10:01
not only money it was all paper money a
10:05
nickel was paper money our time was
10:09
faithful and the only coin we had was a
10:11
penny everything else was paper money
10:13
all different colors so that actually
10:16
the paper money was different from the
10:18
real notes in used in the United States
10:21
at the total yes we’re in US currency at
10:24
all so you are able to buy things with
10:28
that paper note right right and what
10:31
today’s what did soldiers do with the
10:33
money do they send the money back to
10:35
their family were able to do that or
10:38
ocean tell me well I’m a married
10:41
individual a married man I will shrivel
10:44
money oh you meant you were married and
10:46
I wasn’t married I was Footloose and
10:48
fancy-free
10:50
now the merry guys they had to send back
10:53
roughly and they were forced to do it
10:56
was a not much of a choice but probably
10:59
about hated the son of that pay to that
11:02
to that family I mean a family how to
11:04
survive somehow it couldn’t let the guy
11:07
gamble as money away career where he
11:10
plays all that much but that’s that’s
11:14
how they were paid and they could spend
11:18
that money on the PX the Post Exchange
11:20
which was all those apartments to one
11:23
another i wanna know come on at least
11:27
for these guys to buy cigarettes if you
11:31
use a model but they were a dollar
11:33
o’clock in some sense a pack now how
11:36
much your cigarettes eleven dollars of
11:38
packaging depends on where you buy it
11:40
and you have to use a credit card
11:41
sometimes okay well i might add strange
11:45
but that’s the way it was so base
11:47
actually send mail out the paper money
11:51
back to family using the united states
11:53
and they were able to come LT dublin /
11:55
would take it out of the pay okay all
11:58
these fellows they would never see him
12:00
okay in the government Shunta money it’s
12:03
on to the families and we we picked the
12:09
money we picked all money have to pay
12:10
the troops in Taegu we sure have to run
12:14
a free train to take oh which was a lot
12:16
of fun back then the trains weren’t very
12:19
fast you know but it was interesting
12:22
which was I haven’t got to see a lot of
12:25
the countryside
12:27
rice fields and the people working in
12:29
rice fields in it and it kids alongside
12:31
in the track there were always kids they
12:37
know they obviously want to chocolate
12:39
our races or anything that we could
12:41
throw to so it was interesting so you
12:45
will find this year during the Korean
12:47
War el how powerful was that
12:49
organization within the command post Oh
12:52
didn’t have what i would consider to be
12:55
a great deal of power um except that we
12:59
got mad at you we could hide your fake
13:03
hard and you wouldn’t get paid and that
13:05
gave us a little power but it was a very
13:09
problem if it was it was just a banking
13:13
situation to begin a lot of money what
13:19
am I the one true you know obviously
13:21
without after your troops with a troop
13:23
see the one you were all about mine
13:25
you’re there in Korea when the Armistice
13:29
was signed to my 27th of 1953 yes next
13:34
year will be six years anniversary of
13:36
those who do describe your solo what is
13:42
it what how did you feel about it when
13:44
you first arrived when I first arrived
13:46
on criminal first thought about it what
13:49
about the Armistice when I first heard
13:52
about the Ellimist asst I immediately
13:55
started applying to us colleges and I
13:59
love you ass man so that’s what I did I
14:01
have medially set applications to
14:03
colleges ah because I ideally wanted to
14:07
go to college I my family was not able
14:10
to cope with the expense so the GI bill
14:13
was a great benefit warming and I used
14:17
the GI bill always through my master’s
14:20
program so that was a tremendous asset
14:24
for me
14:27
so that was my first reaction to the
14:30
armistice hey it’s over it’s over so
14:33
we’re going to go home and I got to get
14:37
ready to proceed with my life and I
14:42
believe it or not I had a great design
14:44
of the Mary so when I came home I looked
14:52
all over the girls in fact my wife is
14:55
was a blind date that I married to have
14:58
a 55 years then so we’ll get back to
15:01
that okay so when did you leave for
15:07
United States from Korea i love the
15:10
Pusan and be early i told no 1954 1954
15:21
so you all stationed in seoul well i
15:26
brought the whole time yes your service
15:28
like yes could you describe any painful
15:34
most painful or difficult memories that
15:38
you had during their service and the
15:40
happy small ones or you want to share
15:43
that so unlike difficult clients had to
15:45
do with with kids that you would ever
15:49
bliss or the streets I mean they were
15:51
waves they were starving you know I
15:56
never they didn’t have much and always
16:01
tour at me and we hide we hired some of
16:05
these children to be what we called
16:08
house was and we had more of a songs and
16:14
they were always very polite and I’m
16:18
extremely point I was my kids have been
16:20
that polite but I’m sorry I just had a
16:27
feel sorrowful then we did a lot for we
16:32
have one of young dude I’ll remember he
16:34
was oh I guess seven when we pick them
16:38
up on officer
16:39
sizzle and we picked them up because it
16:43
was still improved from our operation so
16:50
what we try to explain to us not to
16:52
steal it laughter this one but he didn’t
16:55
know that but and we took him in and we
17:01
hit home and it was things like that
17:06
bring tears to your eyes lot of us out
17:10
here there so they were the sum of the
17:13
sadder moments of my like a rare over
17:15
that joyful moments well I’m gonna home
17:24
I had four of a kind of a poker game
17:26
wore a lot of money we had we had
17:31
believed in her that we had a dance hall
17:34
and a bar in the building we were in an
17:36
insult we had taken over the water
17:40
companies building we had then we fixed
17:44
it all up and those of our dance floor
17:48
that one the guys from the front lines
17:51
came back on leave we would live with a
17:54
place to go my ten cents for a blood
17:58
wasn’t ya can’t beat it cigarettes ten
18:04
cents a pact good lord so there weren’t
18:10
many joyful moments on I’ll be waiting
18:12
when you say joyful you know a jump off
18:15
them down in there was a bad I existed I
18:19
never had any complaints I have my three
18:23
meals a day now donuts in the morning
18:26
with coffee did you write back to your
18:31
family during the service all constantly
18:34
constantly I just started back I don’t
18:37
know how many of the letters i have but
18:38
I’ll better i have 100 of them at home
18:41
has to have them you still have that
18:44
letter is that i wrote to my mother
18:47
unless this
18:47
oh you know would you be willing to
18:49
share that with us I’m sure oh that
18:52
there will be crazy oh sure I don’t know
18:54
how many one I don’t even remember what
18:56
I said these letters I gotta be honest
18:59
raised up I have read the better in 50
19:01
years right but be glad to do that and I
19:06
can have my son scan those in an email
19:08
on to you yeah okay so when you left for
19:12
the united states around october of 1954
19:15
you said that you apply for college did
19:19
you get into it or what college did you
19:21
go and tell me about how you met with
19:24
your wife okay well let’s start with
19:27
college because i said when i got back i
19:30
feel familiar with long island at all
19:33
this to colleges all around oxford
19:36
university and adelphi university so I
19:41
had the choice will be the one and i
19:43
chose adult fly because i was able to go
19:46
to i had to go to night school because i
19:49
had to work oh ok where did you work IBM
19:53
idea before anybody ever heard of IBM
19:56
IBM back then was they made scales
20:01
butcher scale dayton scales really oh
20:04
yeah ibm’s it was there were no
20:06
computers back right 1955 like my first
20:11
over with work them they had the punch
20:16
card systems you know that but they
20:19
weren’t appearance how much did they pay
20:21
you 65 hours a week that was my
20:26
beginning salary quite candidly I was
20:29
only open 50 block but then they gave me
20:33
a test and I got 100 in a mask test so
20:35
they gave me an extra 10 tons of sound
20:39
with a lot of money today but back then
20:40
ten dollars paid my transportation pay
20:45
my water evil and so then I went to
20:50
adult by University and the reason I
20:52
went there I was able to graduate
20:53
undergraduate my undergraduate degree
20:57
Florida happiest which is what all the
20:59
cynical going full time day time yeah
21:02
and then I spent two and a half is for
21:05
my master’s program what did you study
21:07
finance why not why not I was I was
21:13
loved them the manipulation of numbers
21:15
and it just came naturally so with IBM I
21:24
I was I was a full-fledged accountant
21:28
not with them I was at what they call
21:32
the risk manager all IBM and the risk
21:35
manager essentially you might call it
21:38
the insurance manager right but I there
21:41
was a big company mm-hmm and I ran their
21:45
insurance program well I worked for when
21:47
Leggett eight years before I can risk
21:49
manager and I ran their program and i
21:53
would put 25 years and I was responsible
21:56
the worldwide insurance obligations that
22:00
we had whether we boarded one line is
22:02
it’s a point we had a measure the risk
22:04
of determine the best route to take
22:05
united game right yeah and it was a I
22:10
loved it was a wonderful job I don’t
22:13
with NASA because I’ll computers blew
22:15
the space shuttles I don’t was what’s he
22:21
is a man in the FAA you know flight
22:26
control there are plain control and fort
22:29
controls because our computers were all
22:31
over the place background and that was
22:34
these people argued with them all the
22:37
time it was a great telephone I enjoyed
22:39
it very much well my big issues was a
22:43
feral government was they wouldn’t
22:47
indentify IBM it’s a space shuttle
22:49
crashed on chicago forces and let’s
22:53
assume that our computer might have been
22:54
up all right you can’t buy enough
22:58
insurance in the world to pay all those
23:00
people
23:01
we might die etc so finally I was
23:06
successful in getting them to go to
23:08
Congress and Congress approved
23:10
indemnification of the IBM corporation
23:13
plus a lot of other corporations and I
23:16
enjoy the type of opportunity I won’t go
23:19
to Washington DC and I love going or I
23:22
traveled or so how would you assess the
23:25
impact of Korean War and your service in
23:28
your life oh I say it woke me up I was a
23:33
wet nosed kid one I mean I began that
23:37
kids have 18 today no more about the
23:40
world in life then I knew when I was 24
23:43
I was just so scared I might have just
23:47
learned an awful lot and it got to
23:50
appreciate things more you know like I
23:52
there i am the career of people are
23:55
nothing I come home and everybody moves
23:57
by a cause that was good for Hyundai and
24:03
it was a visit to / world where you live
24:07
in the plan for so many words it was oh
24:10
well we’ll go back to what I said before
24:13
woke me up it made me more for sure have
24:17
you done any business with Korea Korean
24:19
company while you’re serving in DI IBM
24:22
oh no in fact iBM if they had it I don’t
24:28
even think we have an office in Korea
24:32
yep we had a whopper Susan over Chester
24:35
I could think of but I just don’t
24:37
remember any of us in Korea so long
24:39
enjoyed this is with with Korea in the
24:43
reinsurance business right right what
24:48
was the reaction when you are from your
24:51
people that you knew when you get back
24:55
got back to the United States from Korea
24:57
what was the reaction of the people how
25:00
do they treat you and number you could
25:02
you comment about why the Queen was in
25:05
Seoul unpopular regarded as on
25:08
you’re in American politics and
25:12
interesting question I you know I can’t
25:16
I can’t give you one answer for that but
25:18
there’s a million answer so that it was
25:22
unpopular because it wasn’t about the
25:24
United States war it was the United
25:27
Nations for I mean against my old family
25:31
as an example I didn’t think the United
25:33
Nations had any any business telling the
25:37
world what to do that was the way it was
25:40
back then people are used to that type
25:42
of situation we have a government with
25:46
our government rocks type of situation
25:50
at why not okay I subscribe to that
25:53
today I don’t want even telling you what
25:56
to do those new I don’t think but I’ll
25:59
live up to you but people didn’t the
26:02
people it was almost like the equivalent
26:04
of Vietnam of God military people were
26:10
hate him I wasn’t hating but I was
26:15
careful to avoid any spectacle I didn’t
26:20
wear my uniform around the neighborhood
26:23
I didn’t wear any monetary time to Chloe
26:26
I really didn’t talk about people didn’t
26:32
want to hear about it and I have no idea
26:34
what these sole reason was for that but
26:39
good old moms don’t want this onus to go
26:42
to war you know have you ever had chance
26:48
to go back and visit Korea all right
26:50
let’s go Bastian that was the first time
26:53
love is the first time how did you feel
26:55
about well discard it I like what my
27:01
wife don’t look scared then when would
27:05
be a wife I’ll shoot him sure I take a
27:10
river that’s why I’m area and she was
27:14
petrified
27:16
I know that wasn’t your question where
27:18
the she was scared stiff and she was
27:21
scared because of the stories of almost
27:22
correct mm-hmm she sought sure should we
27:25
have I had a bomb dropped on her head
27:27
was she but no other reason but she was
27:30
that so you went to the place where you
27:37
I tried very hard to blame mm-hmm what
27:41
do you think about the changes that one
27:43
witness there I I really didn’t believe
27:45
soul is a a concrete city that way it’s
27:51
a it’s a nut I was flabbergasted I had
27:56
no idea coming up we landed an obviously
28:01
an inch on the bus it was it was fun
28:06
because as we were riding down the
28:08
streets which are things that were all
28:11
familiar with dunkin donuts hammer
28:16
heavens you know when i’m a hamburger
28:18
place you wanted 7-eleven Trump Tower I
28:23
didn’t know what’s wrong part of town of
28:25
them but from town and it was amazing to
28:28
me to me it looked like New York City
28:32
and the hotel I’ll tell we were and I
28:37
Cameron on with the neighbor that I
28:38
apologize for I was
28:41
that’s magnificent oh maybe I shouldn’t
28:47
do it online but i love the bathroom in
28:51
the hotel I think the toilets were made
28:55
by panasonic and we’re in Omagh any of a
28:58
computer i was here huh hey push buttons
29:02
here text me water shut up all of it was
29:05
for Android and they trigger this
29:08
tritanus royally really everything was
29:14
then bang boom I’m a very prompt guy I
29:17
like to accept today I was late I know I
29:19
promised but everything was right on
29:23
time it was amazing the buses were there
29:26
people were there everything was there
29:28
and it was raining had raincoats and
29:31
umbrellas retina he got he got the
29:36
feeling couldn’t do enough for us for us
29:38
all right what do it was just great deal
29:45
of fun unfortunately a rain for five
29:48
days somebody will there I guess I want
29:51
some season came in a little earlier
29:52
than I remembered i went in june because
29:54
i wanted it to be warm we were told one
29:58
day I don’t leave the hotel because it
29:59
was race long I like to see now that
30:03
rivers gonna float again because I
30:05
remember the river flooding dawn Berlin
30:08
back then I read women washing the
30:10
clothing on the rocks of the han river
30:12
and the river got all the blowing its
30:16
banks all sorts of good stuff but yeah I
30:21
enjoy going back it was just a bit more
30:23
I’d like to see more but we were Stanley
30:26
because of the weather we could get the
30:29
Pamela John my wife was thrilled was
30:32
that they let her and
30:34
well I little oldest step into North
30:36
Korea on the other side of the table to
30:39
take pictures of my wife was school
30:41
she’s was that was the moment of my life
30:43
that she could go home say I was an
30:45
Oscar hmm without the ishara mm-hmm so
30:53
we did have a good time weird right
30:54
that’s a woman once they I have to say
30:57
mm-hmm what we were in a hotel when I
31:00
got into the hotel would after the
31:01
airport the driver I have I needed to be
31:04
a so bad so I opened up the little
31:07
refrigerator right which is coming to a
31:09
lot of hotels but I never looked at the
31:11
priceless I drank your blood was what my
31:15
says you just drank twenty-eight dollars
31:17
worth of beer 1400 my god so next day I
31:24
get up I went down a lobbying i asked
31:25
the phone oh I mean where’s the nearest
31:28
7-eleven it was right around the corner
31:31
from the hotel that bought a six-pack
31:33
for about ninety dollars an irish place
31:35
the tube it’s just a little interesting
31:37
sidelight Oh half a bottle of wine was
31:42
ninety dollars on and on we go it is one
31:46
of the most expensive city in the world
31:48
oh yeah I mean you’d say because you
31:51
protected us and you become successful
31:53
in economy so i started doing luck yep
31:56
I’m the gasoline arose about nine holes
31:59
ago gasoline is triple of what you’re
32:02
paying here and with that we’re really
32:05
complaining as you know at four dollars
32:08
a gallon so you saw the sea change when
32:11
you serve during the Korean War and when
32:14
you visited 2011 Allah dramatic it was
32:18
like going from New York City tamales
32:20
and then then back again how would you
32:25
describe and characterize the legacy of
32:27
criminal veterans the legacy yeah or
32:32
what is the importance of what you did
32:35
and how do you think that it’s been paid
32:37
off my perspective okay i’m sure a lot
32:41
of other fellows show same facility as I
32:44
look at South Korea’s progress over the
32:47
last
32:48
two years I am flabbergasted am I really
32:51
flabbergasted why do you what exercises
32:54
an escape applaud or any the 17th
32:56
lawrence’s of coming in a world that’s
32:57
absolutely beyond imagination and
33:01
there’s a lot of pride in me although I
33:04
was in the guy fighting on the front
33:06
lines but I still was there and I
33:08
thought I contributed something done
33:10
somebody having to do what I did and I
33:15
just amazing amazing I was from the way
33:22
a honda automobile and hanoi ships and
33:25
largest balloons of the world how do you
33:28
think about all those things and you
33:30
have to be amazed if you know anything
33:33
about career back 60 years ago when it
33:37
was fine basically plumbing now you are
33:41
manufacturing anything back in nineteen
33:43
fifty one fifty he will fight the war so
33:49
I’m taking up a lot of time it no no no
33:51
no no no something so do you have any
33:58
message to the young generations in the
34:01
united states and also for the korea or
34:04
any other young generations in countries
34:06
about the war you want to say anything
34:10
to the future generation well I wish
34:13
that little early curr generation’s all
34:15
right the more recent generation so I’ll
34:17
give you the last two or three a little
34:20
more about history and history is
34:24
everything but in my life but is
34:27
everything they 11 children today they
34:31
where is great what Korean War I have a
34:35
la screen been born in 10 she questioned
34:39
the weather in our I really was in the
34:42
Korean War when I just wear that hat
34:44
because I wanted to show off I have you
34:47
commence if any role I reckon and I pull
34:49
they’ll make me on my papers and I gave
34:52
it my wall and I show them to her they
34:56
they don’t know much about career
34:58
but my kids know a lot about careers or
35:03
i was there and i got all these pictures
35:05
and things Momentum’s I have all I even
35:10
have a low blow from my japanese girl
35:12
hmm I was young home aqui I’ll never
35:15
forget she was a Shakespearean student
35:19
in college nicely nice young lady but
35:23
being as it was you know they sent me
35:27
home but how do I get how do I did it
35:33
across the people that they should know
35:35
more I think they should know more but
35:38
ever more that we were ever involved in
35:40
I’m sure your people know about all wars
35:44
you were involved in and I’m sure you
35:48
never forgot the Japanese whatever they
35:53
were there they were the nicest people
35:55
in the world how would i get them do a
36:01
11 we don’t have it out where I am on
36:05
Long Island but we’ll talk America
36:07
program I think it’s cool yeah telomeric
36:11
hotel you’re right great program I was
36:17
commander out there in Southampton of
36:19
the of the local chapter I couldn’t get
36:21
I couldn’t get my guys to do anything so
36:27
tell America just wouldn’t happen out
36:30
there but that’s wonderful thing going
36:32
to the schools and showing the kids tell
36:35
the kids talking to him yoooo life sex
36:39
life experiences so they can appreciate
36:41
maybe understand maybe not appreciate
36:43
but they can understand are you still
36:45
belong to the Southampton sector no I
36:47
you belong to a lowering though I don’t
36:50
want any chapter ok long story like I
36:56
got let me tell the story I got
36:58
aggravated because I couldn’t get
37:00
anybody to participate in anything mmm
37:02
so i really like I reason
37:05
I gave up but I come here I love these
37:10
guys I in the people up here is whole
37:14
involved so low as I made a presentation
37:19
in this morning there are what 2.1
37:22
million Cornwall veteran is still there
37:24
in in the United States that’s a
37:26
surprise wedding victor will that money
37:28
right and I realized that there are only
37:30
about fourteen thousand members in the
37:33
National chapter I do you have any idea
37:37
how we can get more people involved and
37:40
active well I have some ideas whether
37:45
they’re good ideas that don’t anybody’s
37:47
guess they need the i call it
37:51
advertising but more exposure to the
37:56
grave do it magazine for us it’s okay
37:58
nice magazine I enjoy all of us enjoy
38:01
right woody no he wasn’t see it should
38:07
you have it all understand i don’t know
38:09
like you were to try hey got any good
38:13
press coverage how do you get TV
38:16
coverage on radio coverage and exposed
38:20
to be an analogy if you will it may not
38:24
be the best analogy but the korea
38:26
governmental bikes us back and they bite
38:30
his back kind of an appreciation and
38:33
they pay a lot of bills I paid to have
38:35
to have the airfare okay I think paid
38:38
everything else and I was magnificent
38:40
mm-hmm all right nobody knows about hmm
38:45
I thought the Korean bikers never heard
38:47
of a program hmm it needs exposure so
38:53
somehow so how this exposure has to be
38:56
developed obviously you know cause a lot
38:59
of money advertise on TV oh I so I said
39:02
but maybe it would do the trick maybe
39:03
the Korean government would do well to
39:07
do a little advertising a little
39:09
American TV I don’t I don’t want here
39:13
Korean government advertising and
39:17
showing off hey we invite your veterans
39:21
well we have my all about respect
39:24
laughably were there were 29 20,000 30
39:28
last year not my blood you see this
39:32
Howard a ball with these guys and I want
39:33
to dance all the time they were crazy in
39:36
a nice way so Korean tell me why should
39:40
I I just can’t imagine why they never
39:42
exposed that program to a population
39:47
more actively right yeah sure that me
39:50
like you know Bill O’Reilly I don’t know
39:53
why he doesn’t like South Korea but he
39:56
always has a gripe about South Korea
39:59
really Donald Trump he has a big chip on
40:03
her shoulder about South Korea I’m not I
40:07
don’t know why I happy to think that it
40:10
has to do with our troops being on the
40:13
30th parallel and I think Donald Trump
40:17
and I’m not doing the speaking but I
40:20
think Donald Trump’s annoyed that the
40:24
Korean government doesn’t pay the bill
40:25
brought to appear wow you know we got
40:30
25,000 guy said i don’t i don’t want
40:34
pain don’t feel em they’re protecting
40:37
something worth protecting so I don’t
40:46
know what else I can tell you about that
40:48
but I think it needs more exposure
40:50
mm-hmm like maybe you could even write
40:54
it write a letter to Bill O’Reilly
40:56
as a representative agreeing w no
41:00
personally I have to find out exactly
41:02
what its greatness then maybe you could
41:05
help them understand would you be
41:09
willing to tell your friends about this
41:11
Korean War veteran digital memorial and
41:13
let them join you what is your friend
41:18
yeah well I’ve got to talk to we don’t
41:21
have made hellos out there who belonged
41:25
to the organization but I certainly know
41:28
Nolan like to talk to ensure i know that
41:32
you said that you would go out for any
41:35
place to interview and it’s just a
41:37
matter you know what i’ll call it
41:40
bashful why these fellows ever look I
41:43
don’t wanna be I wanna explore new to my
41:48
eyes and I’m Beth will die haha not
41:53
really not really not really no