Korean War Legacy Project

Charles Crow Flies High

Bio

Charles Crow Flies High was born into a military family in Lawton, OK.  After graduating from high school in 1990, he joined the army, noting that he always knew service would be his path.  Charles Crow Flies High was trained as an infantryman at Ft. Still, specializing as a cannon crew member.  He did two tours on the Korean peninsula, with the first occurring in 1993, and the second in 2002.  While in Korea, he served as a member of the United States Forces Korea (USFK) as well as sometimes working as part of the United Nations (UN).  He is proud of his service in defending the Korean people, and is very fond of their culture, even stating that he would love to retire and live on the peninsula.

Video Clips

13 Bravo

Charles Crow Flies High was section chief on a cannon crew. There were 10 crew members in each crew and they included a driver, chief, section chief, gunner, assistant gunner, loader, ammo track crew, and ammo team chief. One of the cannons can be reach up to 30 miles away as he supports the field infantry members.

Tags: Panmunjeom,Basic training,Home front,Pride,Weapons

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mVzMuRqLQE&start=230&end=404

Entering Korea in 1993

In November 1993, Charles Crow Flies High was sent to Korea for his first deployment. He flew into Kimpo Air Force Base and then he was sent to Seoul to get finish setting up to protect South Korea. They were "locked and stocked" at all times from that point forward. Crow Flies HIgh's job was to watch for Kim Jong Il and his North Korean troops to make sure that they didn't take over Seoul.

Tags: Dongducheon,Seoul,Basic training,Civilians,Cold winters,Front lines,Impressions of Korea,Living conditions,North Koreans,Pride,Weapons

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mVzMuRqLQE&start=429&end=575

Knowledge of Korea

Charles Crow Flies High did not know much about Korea before his deployment, except for the details about Korean War. Since many of his relatives were in the military, he knew about the Korean War, and it made him really proud to protect the peninsula just like they did. For both deployments, Charles Crow Flies High stayed for 15 months protecting a variety of areas along the DMZ.

Tags: Panmunjeom,Seoul,Basic training,Civilians,Home front,Impressions of Korea,Living conditions,Pride,Prior knowledge of Korea

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mVzMuRqLQE&start=575&end=870

United States and Republic of Korea

Charles Crow Flies High talks about why the relationship between the United States and the Republic of Korea is a good thing for both countries. Charles Crow Flies High believes that Kim Jung Un is getting influenced by his father, but there is a lot of camaraderie between US troops and Korean civilians. The Korean culture has spread around the United States and he feels that this is a very positive interaction.

Tags: Civilians,Food,Home front,Impressions of Korea,Living conditions,Modern Korea,North Koreans,Pride,South Koreans

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mVzMuRqLQE&start=1584&end=1684

Video Transcript

00:00
hi I’m Charles crow flies high CRO w FL
00:04
IES h igh crow flies high that’s very
00:12
unusual last name and what is your
00:15
birthday tenjune 1972 where were you
00:21
born Lawton Fort Sill Oklahoma ah Lawton
00:27
Oklahoma mm-hmm that’s where the Fort
00:31
Sill located as correct yeah home with
00:33
the artillery yes so tell me about your
00:36
family when you were growing up there my
00:40
family was a my family military a father
00:44
was a you know he was a nco in the
00:48
artillery there at Fort sale my uh I
00:52
pretty much raised up there I got to go
00:55
to I got to go to Germany one time as a
00:58
dependent with my father he was a hard
01:03
man it was drill sergeant at Fort Sill
01:05
it was he was fair though I mean hard
01:08
but fair my father was a great sa great
01:15
motivator in my life hmm heading just
01:19
you know heading in the direction i took
01:23
my uh my whole key my whole key to
01:27
everything was mother and father both my
01:31
younger sister who is now deceased she
01:36
she was also also a pertinent part of my
01:40
you know my life coming up I think
01:43
that’s the reason why when I lost my
01:45
mother and my father my last play by my
01:48
sister and my mother and the same year
01:50
that was pertinent in my career heading
01:54
towards you know heading toward where I
01:55
am at today as far as you know as far as
02:00
career goes I was pretty much destined
02:04
to join the army it was a like army oh
02:08
that’s my whole life that was my whole
02:11
life army all the way
02:13
I had discipline I just one thing I do
02:16
as I grew up with a lot of discipline so
02:21
some of the kids that you know that
02:22
we’re coming up in the world you know
02:25
you know mommy and daddy type things
02:27
they’re gonna get it for me I didn’t
02:29
have that you know my father was what my
02:33
father got to the point what he call
02:35
that uh if you want it go work for it
02:42
and that’s how I got that’s how I got to
02:45
where I am that today you know my uh but
02:50
as far as you know my mother my mother
02:52
my father and my sister you know but my
02:55
dad being retired first or you know at
02:58
the United States Army uh who’s still
03:00
living great influence in my life what
03:03
high school did you graduate I graduated
03:06
lot in high school Lawton Oklahoma
03:08
saying when my mother graduated from mmm
03:11
when did you graduate i graduated in
03:13
nineteen ninety and then what did you do
03:17
donia join the military right after that
03:20
right after that join the military where
03:22
did you when did you join remember the
03:24
date and month i want to say is kenny
03:32
wary of 1990 he has correct sir where
03:37
did you get the basic military training
03:38
for CHL Oklahoma you don’t go anywhere
03:41
nope didn’t have to go anywhere what was
03:45
your specialty 13 Bravo what is that
03:49
that is a 13 Bravo is a cannon
03:52
crewmember it’s learning learning the
03:57
ins and outs of the of the field
03:58
artillery you know I understand but the
04:02
audience will be ok done so you need to
04:05
explain detail what do you mean by
04:07
cannon crewmember can do you remember is
04:10
the big they’re the biggest guns the
04:11
Army has ok and the field artillery is a
04:16
support of the infantry ok when they
04:19
call for fire we’re there that’s why
04:22
they’re known as the king of battle ok
04:24
and it’s the job of the crew members
04:27
you know how many crew members they’re
04:29
supposed to be there supposed to be Ted
04:31
just like there is an infantry school oh
04:33
one cannon for one gun section that’s
04:35
correct ten crew members 10 crew members
04:38
tell me about each role okay by the 10
04:42
okay in reality though we were we were
04:46
short manned a whole lot the most i
04:48
probably a lot of the lot of times crew
04:51
members were crew members were in the
04:52
78th at most he’s job you had to have a
04:57
driver for the gun you got to have your
05:00
chief your section chief which step
05:02
there tells you hey this is what goes
05:03
with what don’t go you got your gunner
05:06
you have your assistant your honor and
05:08
you have a you have what they call the
05:09
loader okay there’s also a crew for the
05:13
for the Apple track that goes with it
05:16
keep those shells ready this is what
05:18
we’re firing and that’s let’s put the
05:21
responsibility mo team chief was guide
05:26
them it refuses ready get your get your
05:28
rounds ready get you all your powders
05:29
boom pretty much that’s the way it went
05:33
and then soon as they call for so
05:36
there’s okay we got a mission fire it
05:38
boom and it was a it was a good
05:42
experience as they actually call the
05:45
field artillery the best instructors in
05:47
the United States Army who a member of
05:49
10 crew what what was your role my role
05:51
was section chief section chief so you
05:54
were in charge yes how accurate this
05:57
cannon can be depending on the grid
06:01
depending on the grid it can be anywhere
06:04
from anywhere dead on spot Cold Steel on
06:08
target or it could be anywhere within I
06:12
would say within 50 meters 15 metre
06:17
fifty meters 50 meters yes that’s for
06:20
what is the distance that he can reach
06:23
with the head we had a wrap round
06:25
rocket-assisted projectile which had
06:28
which had a boost on it it could reach
06:31
up to as high as 30 miles 30 mile 30
06:34
miles wow so out of the blue that can
06:39
just get to the end of this correct they
06:41
called it the killer jr. hmm hit the
06:44
enemy by surprise and let him let him
06:46
suffer did your father served in any war
06:51
no he did not uh-huh so he was not in
06:54
Korean War no no he was too young right
06:58
no he uh yeah he’s so he’s too young to
07:02
then yeah he’s uh his only like my
07:05
father’s only probably 67 years old
07:07
mmhmm yeah um so when did you leave for
07:13
korea first time i left the korea in
07:17
november of 93 from Fort Carson Colorado
07:22
from Fort Carson Colorado Carson yep CA
07:27
are som yep what was your mission and
07:33
where did you go tell me about those
07:35
details the details of my first trip to
07:38
Korea the mission basically is you get
07:43
your assignment you go your report it’s
07:49
all about basically that time it was
07:52
about Kim Jong Il especially I mean his
07:58
I guess as they say is his wanting to
08:02
take I mean you wanted to take some soul
08:05
that’s what they wanted and our job as
08:09
as all soldiers didn’t matter what sold
08:13
you a matter if your field artillery it
08:14
matter if your tanker didn’t matter if
08:16
you’re in for treatment didn’t matter
08:18
what you were your so your sole mission
08:20
when you got the Korea let’s do you get
08:25
locked stock ready to rock okay you do
08:29
not allow anybody to Dover over do what
08:35
he caught it to overrun you mm-hm you
08:37
fight till death so um did you fly or
08:42
what did I did you fly from Fort Carson
08:46
to Korea yeah uh-huh I had go to I had
08:50
to go to uh we call that first time I
08:52
went I had to go
08:53
a fort leonard wood mm-hmm and that was
08:55
they call a little korea and that gets
08:58
you kind of adapted to what you know
08:59
what’s going on and then dan and we all
09:02
got you know then we all got booked and
09:04
we flew to we they flew us into a kimpo
09:08
gimpo and soul yep upon arrival we got
09:12
you know you we hit the total farm as we
09:15
called it because it takes you 365 days
09:18
to get from one building to the other
09:20
one or sit right next to each other got
09:24
there and it gets you they get you
09:25
adapted acclimated whatever the case may
09:28
be because it’s cold and you’re over
09:30
freezing and guess what that’s what it
09:33
was all about solution did you know
09:36
anything about Korea before you left for
09:39
Korea actually no sir I did not did you
09:43
know anything about Korean War I knew
09:46
the Korean War was five my grandfather
09:47
my mom’s side fought the Korean War all
09:50
really yep he sure did he bought by I
09:54
was the second generation I in my fit
09:58
with my family I saved my mom’s side of
10:00
the family to have served on the Korean
10:03
Peninsula so your mom’s father served
10:05
correct Korean War know what’s his name
10:08
yep sure do what do you see my
10:11
grandfather’s name was William Alfred
10:15
burial he a ryo berry o yep and that’s
10:22
your mother side grandfather yep that’s
10:25
my mother sigh dad yeah and he served in
10:29
the war right yep he served two Korean
10:30
War he did World War two Korea and
10:34
Vietnam so you really not know anything
10:39
about Korea but you knew about the
10:41
Korean War oh yeah I do about the other
10:43
war yeah I do I had I knew I had family
10:46
members that had served in the Korean
10:47
War my grandfather made me proud you
10:52
know to be you know to be able to to
10:55
follow a legacy like that of the
10:59
division alerts that we had the cold you
11:03
know it gives you it gives you an
11:05
insight on
11:07
what was really going on you know back
11:09
in the 50s back when that all took place
11:11
I did good I did get go to Seoul the
11:15
first time when we r we went down there
11:18
and we saw the museum and you know the
11:22
kings and queens of the of Korea at the
11:25
time I thought it was I thought it was
11:26
majestic I enjoyed it I like the history
11:30
and that’s how I really got you know
11:32
that’s how I really got more into the
11:34
Korean environment my my second time
11:40
over there was even better than the
11:41
first when did you go back I went back
11:44
and so how long did you stay in Korea
11:46
when you went to 1993 own i was there 15
11:51
months uh normally how long can you stay
11:56
there as a soldier well what was your
11:58
rank and where did you I was a I was a
12:01
PFC and made it to e4 at the time what
12:06
was your unit by unit at the time was
12:10
Bravo battery 82 the eight field
12:12
artillery how many I’m sorry what
12:14
artillery Bravo battery eight of the
12:17
eight field artillery a dog ate yep etho
12:22
field artillery a to the eighth yep does
12:25
that belong to any division it belonged
12:28
to ID check them train 2nd infantry yep
12:31
where did you station first time I was
12:35
stationed I got stationed at Camp
12:38
Stanley we uh we jumbo mm-hmm and then
12:41
we moved up to we moved up to Hobie
12:44
which is a talker or tongue to Sun as we
12:49
as they say in Korea’s danke Shon I got
12:54
spit on I got put on JSA duty joint
12:57
security area Pamela John I got stuck on
12:59
that 45 cold days it was crazy we had to
13:06
wear the way to where the NATO the NATO
13:08
armbands and all that good stuff and
13:11
they would look at you and say you know
13:13
I was like you think you’re cold look at
13:17
look at these North Koreans you know I’m
13:19
a
13:20
I don’t care what they feel I just like
13:22
I don’t care what they feel you know
13:23
what my job is my job as an American
13:26
American soldier is I will I will
13:29
support and defend the Constitution of
13:32
the United States of America against all
13:34
enemies foreign and domestic and right
13:36
now that’s the enemy ok I will stand out
13:40
here for as long as I possibly can and
13:41
it’s time to go warm up I’ve also i was
13:47
we did a lot of job we did a lot of work
13:49
around the moon sun area especially
13:51
which is where 47 cab was at it was a
13:58
second time i got stationed which was at
14:01
that time the eighth of the eighth field
14:04
artillery got reflagged to the to 2nd
14:06
battalion 17th field artillery station
14:09
in the same place camp Hovey where where
14:11
it was always at we I got straight as
14:18
you go back when did i go back i went
14:21
back november i was november about to so
14:27
what is the regulation how long I was
14:30
supposed to be able to serve in the US
14:35
FK USFK what is the regulation I was
14:39
supposed to serve for a year to my
14:43
knowledge that’s what it was ok and you
14:46
extend it no I was involuntarily
14:49
extended voluntarily extended it right
14:52
well I was involuntarily extended
14:54
because we had you know we had paperwork
14:55
issues so I got stuck I got stuck there
14:58
for the second time I got stuck there
15:00
for three extra months which was dope no
15:03
big deal to me so you are supposed to be
15:06
there for a year and then you can
15:08
voluntarily extend their right but you
15:10
need to be rotations right right yeah
15:13
how about the officers the officers at
15:17
the time i would say at the officers at
15:20
the time were two year no no no most of
15:25
them were most of them were in a
15:27
favorite command they’re taking command
15:29
spots i would say at least two years but
15:32
see nowadays is the
15:33
I it is like that anymore it’s okay you
15:36
do one year with with a unit and then
15:38
you could take another command spot and
15:40
you do you know you do your year at
15:44
least that’s what I’ve been told and
15:46
were officers were were never pretty
15:51
reluctant I mean they were they were
15:53
pretty good how much were you paid in
15:56
1993 as a PFC Lord oh maybe I would say
16:08
it’s hard to remember that one i would i
16:12
would say i was making clothes i was
16:14
about 1,500 a month I’m sorry 15 about
16:17
1,500 a month a month yeah do you know
16:21
how much war the Korean War veterans
16:23
paid probably weigh less than that i
16:27
would say a pse on the average it back
16:30
then in the Korean War was probably
16:32
making in there anywhere in the vicinity
16:33
of about I would say maybe if you’re
16:40
lucky 50 50 70 80 with the combat pay
16:44
you go up to around hundred okay yeah
16:47
that sounds about right okay yeah so but
16:51
you you stayed in the barrel right yep
16:54
stay in the barracks and they give you
16:56
the uniform or did you do you have to
16:58
buy the uniform oh yeah I had to buy
17:00
uniform I know we’re supposed to if we
17:03
had anything that was old everything you
17:06
could DX but then again most the time
17:09
that would take it would take so much
17:10
time for that to happen so you had you
17:13
had to go buy it mmm yeah um you are in
17:19
Korea 1993 and then you went back two
17:22
thousand two that’s correct what is the
17:24
difference that you saw when you were in
17:27
2002 were there much difference but then
17:30
it’s about the 10 year was it yeah so
17:32
I’ll say within a decade I saw I saw a
17:34
big change in the in the motivation I
17:39
saw a big change in how the army of
17:42
transformation was making it was
17:43
technical taking this toll
17:45
and personally I think that the Korean
17:51
environment I personally think all
17:54
soldiers when you go we know if you come
17:57
in the Army I think you should go to
17:58
Korea you know why because I really
18:00
think that’s where the army really is
18:03
that because the ROK army which we work
18:05
closely with was actually they were what
18:09
we were to say 30 years ago you know
18:12
like during Vietnam I really think the
18:16
ROK army has come a long way I enjoyed
18:20
working with them the rocks are majors
18:23
and everybody they were all over there
18:26
were they’d come india since heels for
18:27
teaching the ketosis you know what they
18:30
need you know what you know what they
18:31
were needing to know and I’m tell you
18:33
duh some of those guys were rock hard
18:34
rock steady and fit to you know fit to
18:36
fight motivation level was definitely
18:41
higher esprit de corps it was definitely
18:43
up there you know we had the suffer the
18:46
same consequences is everybody else if
18:48
there was a curfew we lived it and if if
18:53
there wasn’t immediately if the if the
18:55
Koreans decided to start writing for
18:58
some reason for whatever reason yeah we
19:01
got yeah we had to go on lockdown just
19:03
like everybody else but see my second
19:05
time going to Korea I had to deploy from
19:07
Korea to Iraq I probably I’m probably
19:11
one of the very few members of this
19:12
chapter here that Zach that’s actually
19:15
done that so you participate in the war
19:17
with Iraq yeah yeah I deployed from i
19:21
went from i went from Fort Hood here to
19:24
Korea and when I got there you know I
19:26
got to Korea and basically I wouldn’t
19:30
even there that long and I got to go the
19:31
invasion you know the Indian Head
19:34
secondary division second to none I went
19:38
over I went over a part of what they
19:41
call task force therapy g3 ID was
19:44
already there we went on the invasion
19:46
and where were you fact that oh well we
19:50
uh where we stopped at we started a
19:56
dacoit and we drove
19:59
three days yeah we drove all the way up
20:01
i didn’t i didn’t get to go all the way
20:03
back dad no but a lot of them a lot of
20:06
those guys did you know they they we
20:08
were I was wearing the I was born to ID
20:10
so have I been to Baghdad yes several
20:15
times didn’t get to visit Baghdad a
20:18
whole lot to say in you and for tours
20:22
over there but you know what was the
20:29
most difficult thing for you to serve in
20:32
Korea two times what was the most
20:34
difficult thing is it cultural thing is
20:37
it something or what is it weather or i
20:41
would say more the weather than it was
20:44
anything because you know when you go
20:45
from you know you go from the harsh
20:48
brutal winter that Korea does upper to
20:51
you know but you have a very modern very
20:55
good gear oh yeah well here’s everything
20:58
oh yeah but and you don’t have to live
21:00
in all of that stuff didn’t work you
21:03
didn’t have to sleep in the bunk or
21:05
foxhole oh I beg but if you’re oh yeah
21:09
where do we had to go sleep in it in the
21:11
cold itself we had to go dig in we had
21:14
as they say back in the day they call
21:16
cold weather training we’d have to get
21:19
up ruck up better get our rugs together
21:21
we’d have to road march out to this one
21:23
point and they call subarctic
21:25
temperatures so didn’t matter if it was
21:28
30 degrees below zero yeah we went up
21:30
there got out like get onto the onto the
21:34
mountain there and we dug in we slept
21:37
the only the commander was trying to
21:39
prove the commander’s we’re trying to
21:41
prove is that hey you can survive
21:43
subarctic temperatures these guys decide
21:46
you know if North Korea decides they
21:49
want to come down and get us you can
21:52
survive you can survive and that’s what
21:54
our whole that’s what our whole mission
21:55
was it’s about the time of the year that
21:59
they cannot possibly attack but you know
22:01
what I don’t I don’t I I don’t draw I
22:06
wouldn’t choose to go back do it again
22:07
but I don’t dread it what I’ve already
22:08
been through mm-hmm
22:15
what is the thing that you like Korea
22:19
the culture is very wonderful from the
22:23
food to the to the language itself you
22:27
know I didn’t I don’t know all of the
22:30
Korean language but you know I knew
22:32
enough to get me by I knew what I needed
22:36
to do to be able to communicate with ma
22:39
dad everybody else you know involved no
22:43
involved in the situation anywhere
22:45
around me I mean the food is a
22:49
spectacular what is your favorite food
22:51
Korean food ain’t no light cheese ramen
22:54
cheese Romney yes oh yeah we’re
22:58
especially when we went to the field you
23:00
know we had field mall out there and she
23:03
was she cooked and cooked up like some
23:05
of these guys would run a tab up there
23:07
were two hundred dollars I’m like me I
23:10
would settle on maybe you know maybe
23:14
every other day what you know and I give
23:17
me a little so you like ramen oh I’m
23:19
lavake man do i love i love bulgogi not
23:28
to make a fan of k gogi but you tried I
23:34
have what I i did my axe how about
23:37
kimchi I’ve tried a little bit of it I
23:41
can’t really say I can’t really say that
23:43
uh that was a I can’t really say I’m a
23:46
big fan of the of the more spicier
23:49
kimchi but I have tried different
23:52
different different what they call that
23:54
out looks of the kimchi like the kimchi
23:56
pancakes I have tried those they’re not
23:58
there drop bad they’re not really bad
24:00
the first time I was over there I did
24:02
when I wouldn’t touch the stuff but then
24:05
again that’s when I could smell and when
24:08
I could smell the second time I’m like
24:10
the ketosis down there they did they
24:13
have that they’d have them old barracks
24:14
thinking up uh uh of everything we’re
24:17
like wondering what’s going on around
24:19
here i’ll be i can smell if it’s one
24:22
thing another thing that was good about
24:24
that environment with
24:25
is the fact that because of the
24:27
fertilizer is being used in the Curia I
24:30
could tell I could tell when something
24:33
had gone had gone to the restroom I
24:35
could tell whether human dog cow I was
24:40
like wow but you know what that was when
24:43
you know that’s when it kind of helps
24:45
your senses out makes you understand you
24:48
know makes you understand what you know
24:49
more of a lot of Korea still is still
24:54
the old way um did you make a lot of
24:59
friends with the Korean soldiers oh yes
25:01
oh yeah yeah yeah what do you think of
25:04
them I think some of them were more
25:10
about the more about some of them what
25:14
to me about half of them the ones i met
25:16
i think they were more about the you
25:20
know what I don’t really don’t want to
25:22
be your type thing I just want to do my
25:25
two years and you know go on my merry
25:28
way then there was course there was the
25:30
ketosis that we had I had I had a good
25:33
catoosa in my section and i’ll tell you
25:35
right now he was he was on point he was
25:38
he suffered with us if if everybody if
25:43
everybody got he got in trouble just
25:45
like everybody else did if he he got
25:47
trouble he suffered the same thing we
25:48
did and because if he did you know
25:51
usually the rocks are made it was like
25:53
oh no no no you’re you’re with them
25:55
you’re a Korean dog meat each of the
25:57
United States Army and that’s what
25:58
you’re gonna do you’re gonna learn just
25:59
like they do so if so if we suffered he
26:03
suffered to our corporate a good guy
26:10
that could see him again be great i
26:14
would like to i would like to see him
26:16
again he was an outstanding individual
26:18
and I wish them the best a very smart
26:22
individual very smart what do you think
26:25
about the relationship between two
26:27
country Korea and the United States I
26:30
think it’s I think our relationship is
26:33
wonderful I think it needs to stay that
26:35
way
26:39
whatever Kim Jong on decides to do I
26:44
think he’s young I think he doesn’t I
26:49
think he’s kind of he’s being molded
26:51
more by that more by the Society of the
26:54
Socialists around him you know the
26:56
comment whatever you know whatever was
26:57
trained by his a by his father before
27:00
him if you know they if they pay my
27:07
retirement go live in Korea that’s where
27:09
we gonna live I’ll tell you I way I
27:11
loved it I loved it that much over there
27:12
you know I love the I love the people
27:15
that you know that I was there with and
27:17
i would give you you know i would give
27:20
my life for them because i feel at the
27:23
same time though i think what we’ve done
27:25
is we’ve exchanged traditions because
27:28
there’s a big population of the the
27:31
koreans here I like that I like to like
27:35
being over there because you know
27:36
there’s a lot of camaraderie between
27:39
till between the people you know the
27:43
troops and of course there was a lot of
27:46
people that tick them off you know like
27:47
oh yeah I didn’t do that but it was
27:50
necessarily that it was just you know
27:52
getting over temperaments and getting
27:55
communication that is the biggest key
27:57
that’s two to the two you know until the
28:00
to our to our social status with Korea
28:02
and I I enjoyed that yes were there any
28:05
casualties in your unit while you’re in
28:07
Korea not my unit specifically but there
28:12
was there was a few casualties of
28:15
ketosis that happened around the area I
28:21
did notice that they said that a
28:26
headache atusa I guess had jumped off
28:29
something to commit suicide I don’t know
28:32
why I wasn’t there but I could tell you
28:35
this I told him you know when we look
28:37
when we heard about that our catoosa
28:40
said you know corporal che he said hey I
28:43
I knew him and I said well you know my
28:45
condolences go out to you but he might
28:47
have been suffering something and he
28:50
might he might have been thinking
28:51
he was the only one going through it or
28:53
whatever the case may be it probably
28:54
didn’t seek help but you know it’s sad
29:00
to see that you know that that did that
29:02
that happened or they might have
29:04
forgotten to a fight or something I
29:06
don’t know but my foundation wants to
29:11
recognize us FK US soldier who’s
29:14
stationed in Korea after the war right
29:17
it’s not just about the security Korea
29:20
but also you made a contribution to many
29:24
different sectors of our society right
29:27
you wore out artillery unit right you
29:29
may have more technology transfer to
29:32
korean artillery right needs medical
29:37
engineering management everything right
29:41
in many different parts of your military
29:43
actually you know share your knowledge
29:46
and technology with the Korean people a
29:49
Korean society so that you really
29:51
contribute to the development of Korean
29:55
social economic cultural development
29:58
exactly and we exchanged together it’s
30:00
not just one sided as you mentioned is
30:03
all communications right communication
30:06
yeah so my foundation really wants to
30:08
work with the Korea defense veteran
30:11
that’s how we rename it right you are
30:13
the Korea defense veteran is correct
30:15
compared to Korean War veteran right so
30:19
someday we hope that we can form an big
30:23
organization Korea defense veteran and
30:26
we gather together and celebrating the
30:28
you know commemorating and celebrating
30:31
our annual convention right maybe you
30:34
can start from killing because you have
30:36
a fort hood here the biggest one yes and
30:39
there’s law and like like I’m trying to
30:42
do now any Korean Defense Service
30:46
veteran that was you know that’s coming
30:48
back from coming back from the peninsula
30:50
I’m trying to get them on board here
30:53
yeah there are many in oh there’s
30:56
a–there’s a ton of them United States
30:58
forces Korea and
31:00
and in America it is a strong
31:03
organization it needs to grow stronger
31:05
yep yep and I totally belong to que todo
31:08
VA yes I do ah and gotcha gotcha do you
31:12
know let’s go together I’ll say I’m
31:14
gonna say come I’m sacrum something down
31:17
thank you yep